Photo
sussexwildlifetrust:

Frog. Please watch out for young frogs if you are mowing the grass today : )

sussexwildlifetrust:

Frog. Please watch out for young frogs if you are mowing the grass today : )

Photo
John Walters guides to British Beetles are available to download here:
http://johnwalters.co.uk/publications/guide-to-british-beetles.php

John Walters guides to British Beetles are available to download here:

http://johnwalters.co.uk/publications/guide-to-british-beetles.php

Photo
reynard1884:

Toadstool - Barrow Cemetery

reynard1884:

Toadstool - Barrow Cemetery

Photo
wildfife:

I was in Calderwood, West Lothian’s largest remaining ancient woodland today.  In spring and early summer it was carpeted with wildflowers, but the only one still blooming today was devil’s-bit scabious.  Autumn is definitely here.

wildfife:

I was in Calderwood, West Lothian’s largest remaining ancient woodland today.  In spring and early summer it was carpeted with wildflowers, but the only one still blooming today was devil’s-bit scabious.  Autumn is definitely here.

Photo
sussexwildlifetrust:

Snakelocks sea anemone

sussexwildlifetrust:

Snakelocks sea anemone

Photo
missymoophotography:

#fungi #stives #bingley #yorkshire

missymoophotography:

#fungi #stives #bingley #yorkshire

Photoset

thingswhatisawtoday:

Suffolk August 2014: Sunset; Fungi; Skies above Bungay; Gargoyle on Flixton Church; Rain clouds in Mendham; Diplolepis Rosae - wild rose gall.

Photo
sussexwildlifetrust:

Stag beetles are amazing!

sussexwildlifetrust:

Stag beetles are amazing!

(Source: sussexwildlifetrust.org.uk)

Photo
rhamphotheca:

Ivy Broomrape, Orobanche hederae, Cricketfield Road, Torquay, UK
Broomrape species are without chlorophyll, as they sustain by parasitizing other plants, through the roots, for nutrients.
photograph by Derek Harper

rhamphotheca:

Ivy Broomrape, Orobanche hederae, Cricketfield Road, Torquay, UK

Broomrape species are without chlorophyll, as they sustain by parasitizing other plants, through the roots, for nutrients.

photograph by Derek Harper

Photoset

theconservationbiologist:

Plant of the day - Lady’s Bedstraw (Galium verum)

No correct guesses today. Well this is part of the bedstraw family (Rubiaceae), and can grow up to 100cm.

Leaves are 6-25mm long, linear and dark green, with 8-12 leaves per whorl.

Flowers are 2-4mm across and bright yellow.

It is found on dry calcareous grassland, hay meadows, hedge banks, dunes and cliff tops. It is common in the British Isles and most of Europe.

Similar species:

  • Northern Bedstraw (Galium boreale)image
  • Hedge Bedstraw (Galium mollugo)image